Anonyme
Anonyme a posé la question dans Politics & GovernmentPolitics · il y a 1 décennie

Why do they refer to breast cancer survivors as "heros"?

I understand it is a very difficult thing to under go and I in no way am I trying to put down those that have endured it. But why do they (they meaning commercials and ads and what not) refer to breast cancer survivors as "heros"

They didn't jump on a hand grenade or save a burning bus full of kids... they simply took medicine and didn't die. If they are heros for simply not succumbing to an illness... does that mean that I am a hero because I didn't die when I underwent a sub-occipital craniotomy to sever my right balance nerve in 2008?

I think the term hero is too loosely used these days.... those that risk life and limb are heros... not football stars or rappers or cancer survivors.

I think there is a difference between a role model and a hero.

yes I am sure they are an inspiration and bring hope to a lot of people, but they are not a hero

Mise à jour:

already had my shot partner... had brain surgery in 2008 so I guess I'm more of a hero than a woman that loses a breast right?

Mise à jour 2:

I really don't understand how simply taking meds and not dying... means "you had courage"

Mise à jour 3:

There are plenty of disease considerably worse than Breast Cancer.... Take ALS for example... Why aren't they applauded as heros for surviving

12 réponses

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  • Anonyme
    il y a 1 décennie
    Réponse favorite

    I'd agree with you.

    The word "Hero" is being used to describe all kinds of people who actually aren't doing heroic deeds, but are either enduring something life-threatening, or being just charitable.

    I'm not saying that those things don't deserve appreciation, but let's just call it what it is.

    They could be considered "someone's hero," because that someone strongly admires the feat overcome by the cancer patient, but that doesn't mean that the patient did anything to better humanity.

    Like you said, they took medicine and lived.

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  • il y a 1 décennie

    Ok, I understand your question even though apparantly some of the others either do not or they didnt read all the way through

    I do not see them as heroes. I see them as furtunate survivors of a terrible illness. Yes the term Hero is tossed around way too much and it no longer has the meaning it used to have. when I was in the military and was off base in my uniform, people would thank me for my service (which I appreciated) but some called me a hero. I never did anything that I would consider particularly any more heroic than my other battle buddies. for all these people knew, I could have sat at a desk or been a dirt bag soldier who was stealing from the armory.

    so I agree, surviving serious medical conditions do not by them selves make a person a hero any more than a person being in the military makes them a hero. performing a heroic act in self sacrifice I believe make one a hero.

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  • il y a 1 décennie

    Many women are too afraid to even go in for mammograms, because of the fears and stigma of losing their breasts. The women who do face their fears are to be emulated by other women. It's not a really big deal, why make it one?

    You might have a mom or a sister whose life will be saved because these other women had the courage to fight the battle first.

    My aunt had a double radical mastectomy about 20 years ago. Because of her, I started going in for mammograms at 35. Because of her, some teensy calcifications will probably never advance to cancer.

    Source(s) : It takes nothing from you for someone else to be called a hero. Except that asking a question like this does.
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  • il y a 1 décennie

    I concur, the word Hero has lost its meaning.

    A hero is someone who knowingly and deliberately places themselves at risk to aid another in distress.

    Surviving cancer is a struggle, but the term Hero, by definition, just doesn't fit.

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  • Summer
    Lv 4
    il y a 1 décennie

    Well people who inspire me and bring me hope are my hero, and I'm sure they are hero's to the people who are fighting cancer. They keep them going so they can see there children and grandchildren grow.

    I watched my mom die of cancer very slowly and very painfully believe me it's not a matter of just taking meds.

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  • il y a 1 décennie

    I am a hero because I ate a box of rat poison once and didn't die. I was awarded a medal for it.

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  • ?
    Lv 5
    il y a 1 décennie

    Encouragement. Going through chemo is difficult, to say the least, so they "exaggerate" a bit to instill courage into the people who have to go through to motivate them to stick with it.

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  • Polly
    Lv 6
    il y a 1 décennie

    They don't know about selfless sacrifice, that's don't need to broadcast over the airways or wear a pink ribbon for all to applaud you, that's why.

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  • il y a 1 décennie

    Everyone is a hero these days.

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  • Anonyme
    il y a 1 décennie

    Enjoy your blissful ignorance and I do hope you never need to learn why.

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